Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Open to suggestions...


I just received an email from Penguin about their Black Classics range, now $9.95 in Australia (bargin). Clicking over to the Penguin Black Classic page I scrolled through the varied and wonderful offerings and my imagination landed on So Bright and Delicate: Love Letters and Poems of John Keats to Fanny Brawne  and it got me thinking about wedding readings. It might seem like a tangent, and I grant that it is, but in the back of my mind I know I need to choose readings for my pending nuptials in September. We are getting married in a de-consecrated chapel with a celebrant, so there won't be any hymns or prayers, but I do like the idea of having a couple of readings instead, these could be in the form of poems, letters, quotations etc. I want ones that are romantic, but not too cliched. Any ideas? Any favorite poems or readings suitable for a wedding ceremony?

4 comments:

  1. Oooh, you must be getting excited (in a calm & collected way, not a crazy, bridezilla, hysteric way). I've seen a few glimpses of preparations on Christina's blog & I'm sure it will be a beautiful & special day.
    We had two readings at our wedding, The blessing of the hands (I don't know who wrote it, but it should come up in google) & He & She by Woody Guthrie who was a magnificent song writer.
    It was wonderful to involve special people who weren't in the bridal party to read them for us.
    I'm sure you'll find something to suit you both.
    Have a great week. Kitty x

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  2. Oh, that's such a lovely idea! I'm certain you'll find the perfect book quotation for your wedding!


    Camila Faria

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  3. Pablo Neruda has some great poems, as well as this one "Who Ever Desired Each Other as We Do?", there is "Lovely One" and "I Do Not Love You Except Because I Love You". But I'm sure you will find one that is just perfect :)

    Who ever desired each other as we do? Let us look for the ancient ashes of hearts that burned,and let our kisses touch there, one by one, till the flower, disembodied, rises again.

    Let us love that desire that consumed its own fruit and went down, aspect and power, into the earth: We are its continuing light, its indestructible, fragile seed.

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  4. I would second Neruda as a great source of love poems Fiona. Few do it better, though for an Australian voice, Matt Hetherington's collection, I Think We Have is simply stunning.

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